LAW COURTS CENTER
Raising The Bar In Legal Education


Diversity Dialogues Recorded Session: Implicit Bias - Does Justice Wear a Blindfold or a Mask? (DIV 104R)

  • 23 Dec 2015
  • 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
  • Your office
  • 30

Registration

  • This is a license for one person only. Please register for each person attending. To qualify for CPD hours, you should read the LSBC rules, which include arranging to watch this recording with at least one member of the law society.

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Diversity Dialogue Recorded Session:

 

Implicit Bias - Does Justice Wear a Blindfold or a Mask?  (DIV 104)

Description:

To qualify for CPD hours, you must read the LSBC rules, which include arranging to watch this recording with at least one member of the law society. The course fee is per person.

Provincial Court of BC Judge David St Pierre will be facilitating the conversation.

Data proves that black defendants in the U.S. fare worse than their white counterparts on almost all measurable outcomes within the justice system. Before we get too smug here in Canada and pass this fact off as being unique to our neighbours to the south we need to examine our own outcomes. In Canada, while Aboriginal people make up about 4% of the Canadian population, as of February 2013, 23.2% of the federal inmate population is Aboriginal (First Nation, Métis or Inuit). Researchers have found that while explicit bias does exist and is likely responsible for a part of this disparity it also shows that explicit bias has been declining in recent years.

What is going on then? Is Justice truly blind or is she masking some other unconscious and even more dangerous biases? Neuroscience may hold some answers. Implicit bias refers to the attitudes or stereotypes that affect our understanding, actions, and decisions in an unconscious manner. These biases reside deep in the subconscious and are not readily accessible through introspection. Judges are only human (yes, there is research to prove it!) and humans hold implicit biases that affect decision making. I will explore how these biases manifest themselves and what we can do to possibly compensate for them. The goal is fairness of course. We can move further down that path by increasing awareness of the problems caused by implicit biases and focusing on new and meaningful solutions.

CPD: 1.5 Hours with 0.0 for PRE (ethcis)

Proceeds from this lecture will seed the funding of the expansion of Amici Curiae's Temporary Foreign Worker Uncontested Divorce Project.


AGENDA

5:30 Opening remarks Dom Bautista
5:40 Implicit Bias
6:55 Closing remarks Dom Bautista

For more information

call: 604.685.2727

write: dom@lawcourtscenter.com

Seating is limited to 40!

If you want to attend by webinar, click here.

CPD: 1.5 hours with 1.5 hours for practice management.

Cost:

Webinar Single Seat License:
$78.75 CAD

(View cancellation policy)

For more information contact:
In Vancouver: 604.685.2727

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